Don’t blame the market; blame your marketing

Many unsuccessful founders believe their business failed because of a "market problem." They think it's "the market" that wasn't ready for their product or that "the market" made the wrong choice. This line of thinking is a dangerous —and most of the time completely false— perspective to take. It's not a market problem. It's a … Continue reading Don’t blame the market; blame your marketing

The Risks and Illusions of the “Post-Exit Retirement”

Building and selling a business is a blessing and a curse. While it catapults founders into a very different financial situation, it also shifts what gives them purpose and passion and allows for lasting impact. Chasing these elusive virtues causes many entrepreneurs who thought they could retire to get back to work — or it … Continue reading The Risks and Illusions of the “Post-Exit Retirement”

Permission to Follow Up: The Difference Between Owned & Borrowed Audiences

Email newsletters aren’t new — they might be one of the oldest forms of digital mass communication. I certainly remember signing up for them in the late 90s, when social media didn’t exist. But they’re back with a vengeance because they allow for something that got lost in the age of social media: direct and … Continue reading Permission to Follow Up: The Difference Between Owned & Borrowed Audiences

Parasocial Relationships: Imaginary Friends of the Social Network Age

There are a lot of one-sided relationships on social media. They have many names: superfans, otakus, and stans. When you intimately know the personality, likes, dislikes, and the entire personal history of a person you've never met and never had any one-on-one interaction with, you're likely in a parasocial relationship. These are the imaginary friends … Continue reading Parasocial Relationships: Imaginary Friends of the Social Network Age